THE MIGHTY MIGHTY BOSSTONES Let’s Face It

THE MIGHTY MIGHTY BOSSTONES Let's Face It

From the first notes of the classic skank “Noise Brigade,” an unqualified joy takes over your mind and body.

THE MIGHTY MIGHTY BOSSTONES Let's Face It

It’s the immediate herald of some great news: the Mighty Mighty Bosstones have nailed the target they’ve been trying to hit since 1989’s Devil’s Night Out, and it’s all uphill from here. Eschewing many of the ska-core trappings that marked (some would say marred) their previous releases, Let’s Face It could fall through a hole in time to 1983 and land in a tape deck belonging to a Specials fanatic without fazing them.

The lazy swagger of “Royal Oil” stands out, revealing the evolution of vocalist Dicky Barrett; he’s finally discovered the delicate art of less is more. “When you smoke or poke the poison/you lose the chance to be tomorrow,” Barrett intones, revealing a new and unexpected maturity that reaches full voice on “The Impression That I Get,” where he sheepishly admits “I’m not a coward/I’ve just never been tested.”

Even the hard-rocking numbers make informed, adult statements: ” Numbered Days” blasts senseless violence, the weary protagonist “Nevermind Me” tries to shake off a drug-related robbery and “Break So Easily” contemplates mortality in terms even the most devout mosh-pit hardcase could readily understand. Let’s Face It is the manifestation of the promise the Bosstones have shown for eight years. Here’s to dreams fulfilled.